Category: the castle of cagliostro

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The Castle of Cagliostro (1979, Hayao Miyazaki…

The Castle of Cagliostro (1979, Hayao Miyazaki, Japan)

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Regular

monkeyfaced-trickster:

Okay but can I just gush for a bit about a specific scene in Castle of Cagliostro?

More specifically, I want to gush about how a certain scene uses silence and tranquility to convey a character’s feelings. There’s a scene not long after the famous physics-breaking car chase, where Lupin and Jigen visit the burnt-down ruins of a house that belonged to the “Silver Capricorn” branch of the Cagliostro family. Lupin walks to a part of the property where there’s a gazebo by a lake, and he sits by the water. The music fades out and all that’s heard are the whistling of birds, the rippling of water, and the ringing of the clock tower bell in the distance as the camera pans over the ruins and then the lake. Lupin stares at the silver ring Clarisse had left behind for a moment before he clutches it in her glove.

As I mentioned, before this scene, there was a high-octane car chase that captured the audience’s attention and got them invested. Following it up with a scene devoid of action and/or danger is only natural because it gives the audience breathing room to process the information of what has happened in the film so far. However, this gazebo scene in particular takes it a step further by making those few minutes truly meditative. Nothing narratively important happens in the scene, and there is no dialogue apart from one single line uttered by Lupin. And yet, that moment of silence manages to speak volumes about what Lupin is feeling in the moment, which is nostalgia over a past event in his life that he had almost forgotten. The audience has been given room to not only breathe, but also to ponder on Lupin’s true motivation behind his failed rescue attempt just a few minutes before. That last one especially gives an opening for smooth exposition once Jigen enters the scene, who asks the same question the audience will have at that point: What history did Lupin have here? (Granted, he had to physically force the answer out of Lupin but, you know, that’s what friends are for! :V)

Miyazaki knows how to use silence to convey emotion and build character. Never underestimate the effectiveness of a quiet scene.

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The Castle of Cagliostro (1979, Hayao Miyazaki…

The Castle of Cagliostro (1979, Hayao Miyazaki, Japan)

The Castle of Cagliostro (1979, Hayao Miyazaki…

The Castle of Cagliostro (1979, Hayao Miyazaki, Japan)