Category: paul thomas anderson

cinemagal:

10 FRAMES

Phantom Thread (2017)
Dir. Paul Thomas Anderson
DoP. Paul Thomas Anderson

shesnake:

Are you sent here to ruin my evening? And possibly my entire life?

Phantom Thread (2017) dir. Paul Thomas Anderson

theartofmoviestills:

Magnolia | Paul Thomas Anderson | 1999

aarontaylorjohnson:

Inherent Vice (2014) dir.

Paul Thomas Anderson

theartofmoviestills:

The Master | Paul Thomas Anderson | 2012

cinemagal:

10 FRAMES

Phantom Thread (2017)
Dir. Paul Thomas Anderson
DoP. Paul Thomas Anderson

thefilmstage:

Quentin Tarantino and Paul Thomas Anderson discuss Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, revising Sharon Tate’s legacy, Leonardo DiCaprio’s comedy, and much more:

I tried to not turn Sharon into a Quentin Tarantino character. Rick’s a Quentin Tarantino character. Cliff’s a Quentin Tarantino character. Even McQueen is a bit of Quentin Tarantino character. In a way, I didn’t want Sharon to be a character. I wanted her to be the person that she is. Now, it’s only my interpretation of the person from what I’ve learned about and I’ve definitely been leaning into the bride in the light stuff, but that really seems to be who she is. If there are other aspects of her out there, I couldn’t find it. But the thing is, was not about her being a character, but the real person. She was almost supposed to represent normalcy in the thing. She doesn’t have any plot to do. We’re watching her live her life because that’s what was robbed from her was living her life.

The fact that she is a person cosigned to history for the most part defined completely and utterly by her tragic death. And in these last four weeks people have watched Margot [Robbie] play this person and they saw that she was more that. She was a lovely person and they get a sense of her spirit and they get a sense of her life and you actually watch her doing things people do in a life–watching errands, driving a car, just doing life stuff, and you even got to see the real Sharon juxtaposed into that. And now I actually think that people will think about her differently than they thought before. It’s not the beginning and end-all of Sharon. There’s still more to learn about her and everything, but I think saving her from her tombstone, the movie has done that to a small degree, but I think a significant degree.

Listen to their full conversation.

stream:


There Will Be Blood (2007) dir. Paul Thomas Anderson

henricavyll:

When I was a boy, I started to hide things in the lining of the garments. Things only I knew were there. Secrets.

Phantom Thread (2017) dir. Paul Thomas Anderson

thefilmstage:

Quentin Tarantino and Paul Thomas Anderson discuss Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, revising Sharon Tate’s legacy, Leonardo DiCaprio’s comedy, and much more:

I tried to not turn Sharon into a Quentin Tarantino character. Rick’s a Quentin Tarantino character. Cliff’s a Quentin Tarantino character. Even McQueen is a bit of Quentin Tarantino character. In a way, I didn’t want Sharon to be a character. I wanted her to be the person that she is. Now, it’s only my interpretation of the person from what I’ve learned about and I’ve definitely been leaning into the bride in the light stuff, but that really seems to be who she is. If there are other aspects of her out there, I couldn’t find it. But the thing is, was not about her being a character, but the real person. She was almost supposed to represent normalcy in the thing. She doesn’t have any plot to do. We’re watching her live her life because that’s what was robbed from her was living her life.

The fact that she is a person cosigned to history for the most part defined completely and utterly by her tragic death. And in these last four weeks people have watched Margot [Robbie] play this person and they saw that she was more that. She was a lovely person and they get a sense of her spirit and they get a sense of her life and you actually watch her doing things people do in a life–watching errands, driving a car, just doing life stuff, and you even got to see the real Sharon juxtaposed into that. And now I actually think that people will think about her differently than they thought before. It’s not the beginning and end-all of Sharon. There’s still more to learn about her and everything, but I think saving her from her tombstone, the movie has done that to a small degree, but I think a significant degree.

Listen to their full conversation.