Category: Guillermo Del Toro

johnnysilverhand:

Crimson Peak (2015) dir. Guillermo del Toro
All Mirrors by Angel Olsen (2019) dir. Ashley Connor
Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust (2000) dir. Yoshiaki Kawajiri
Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992) dir. Francis Ford Coppola

spine-tinglers:

The Devil’s Backbone / El Espinazo del Diablo (2001) dir. Guillermo del Toro

filmgifs:

Things are not that simple. You’re getting older, soon you’ll see that life isn’t like your fairy tales. The world is a cruel place. And you’ll learn that, even if it hurts.

Pan’s Labyrinth / El Laberinto del fauno (2006) dir. Guillermo del Toro

theartofmoviestills:

Pan’s Labyrinth | Guillermo del Toro | 2006

theartofmoviestills:

Pan’s Labyrinth | Guillermo del Toro | 2006

theartofmoviestills:

Pan’s Labyrinth | Guillermo del Toro | 2006

neillblomkamp:

The Shape of Water (2017) Directed by Guillermo del Toro

taronegertonn:

GUILLERMO DEL TORO RECEIVES STAR ON HOLLYWOOD WALK OF FAME 

06/08/2019

“As a Mexican, receiving this star is a gesture and no gesture right now can be banal or simple. This is very important this is happening right now because I can tell to all of you, all immigrants from every nation, that you should believe in the possibilities and not the obstacles. Do not believe the lies they tell about us. Believe in the stories you have inside and believe that we all can make a difference and we all have stories to tell and we all can contribute to the art and the craft and the world in any way we see fit.” – Guillermo del Toro

neillblomkamp:

The Shape of Water (2017) Directed by Guillermo del Toro

joewright:

Academy Award Winners for Best Cinematography:
2007 — Guillermo Navarro, ASC

Pan’s Labyrinth /

El laberinto del fauno

(2006)
Directed by Guillermo del Toro
Aspect Ratio: 1.85 : 1

According to Del Toro, the key element in the design of Pan’s Labyrinth was color. “I put up a big board to color-code the movie for the three key departments,” he says, referring to Navarro, production designer Eugenio Caballero and costume designer Lala Huete. “Those were the colors that were allowed. If it wasn’t there, it wouldn’t exist [in the film].”  

The initial color differentiation between the film’s two worlds was simple: Ofelia’s fantasy world would feature mainly warm colors, primarily “deep crimsons and golden ambers, almost like amniotic fluids,” notes Del Toro. (Indeed, the director’s goal was to suggest a “womblike” environment in some of the fairy-tale sets, a feeling underscored by the use of rounded shapes.) This warmth also infuses the worlds of the rebel fighters in the nearby hills and the friendly housekeeper, Mercedes, who secretly aids the rebels and befriends Ofelia. By contrast, the harsh reality represented by Vidal and his troops is coded in cold hues of blue and green, and many of their environments feature sharp angles.  

As the story unfolds and the parallel narratives start to, in Navarro’s words, “bridge over and rub together,” the colors begin to mix in quite striking ways. “I decided that we were going to do a contamination process, that one world was going to start infecting the other,” says Del Toro. “As the movie goes on, they combine more and achieve a unity, and Ofelia’s view of the world becomes as real as the fascists’.” By using color as their key, says Navarro, “we found the language we needed to help the audience understand the complexity of the movie.”  — [x]