Category: alfred hitchcock

filmaticbby: “What are you running away from?” Psycho (1960)…

filmaticbby:

“What are you running away from?”

Psycho (1960) dir. Alfred Hitchcock

erlichs:ROPE (1948) dir. Alfred Hitchcock

erlichs:

ROPE (1948) dir. Alfred Hitchcock

365filmsbyauroranocte: Joseph Cotten in Shadow of a Doubt…

365filmsbyauroranocte:

Joseph Cotten in Shadow of a Doubt (Alfred Hitchcock, 1943)

365filmsbyauroranocte: Joseph Cotten in Shadow of a Doubt…

365filmsbyauroranocte:

Joseph Cotten in Shadow of a Doubt (Alfred Hitchcock, 1943)

goregirlsdungeon:Vertigo (1958) directed by Alfred Hitchcock

goregirlsdungeon:

Vertigo (1958) directed by Alfred Hitchcock

vintagegal: “We all go a little mad sometimes. Haven’t you?”…

vintagegal:

“We all go a little mad sometimes. Haven’t you?” Psycho (1960) dir. Alfred Hitchcock

filmaticbby:North by Northwest (1959)dir. Alfred Hitchcock

filmaticbby:

North by Northwest (1959)
dir. Alfred Hitchcock

fuckindiva: The visual and narrative style of Strangers on a…

fuckindiva:

The visual and narrative style of Strangers on a Train carries many trademarks of the film noir genre. Reading Bruno Antony as a homosexual villain positions him as Hitchcock’s version of a femme fatale subverting 1950s norms and ushering in a new sexual deviance in cinema that creates a unique spectatorial experience.

Chiaroscuro lighting, having emerged during the silent era through German Expressionism and segueing into Hollywood gangster films of the 1930s, evolved into the low-key lighting patterns of the film noir genre. This visual style, aided by a mise-en-scene of dark claustrophobia, aimed to manifest the nihilistic attitudes of the genre’s morally-torn protagonist. This film noir protagonist, an active male agent, is commonly matched with a femme fatale who utilizes cunning sexuality to further her own gains. Thus, the success of the male protagonist often depends upon his ability to withstand the siren song of the femme fatale. Strangers on a Train exemplifies many of the traits found in the film noir cycle. In addition, the screenplay is credited to Raymond Chandler, an enormously successfully writer of hard-boiled fiction, who also wrote the screenplay for 1944’s landmark film noir Double Indemnity. These hallmarks: a distinct visual style, an active male protagonist, and the femme-fatale all signal the genre of film noir. 

Film noir staples from this period such as Double Indemnity or The Postman Always Rings Twice concern a femme fatale luring a male protagonist to commit murder in exchange for her wild sexuality.  This narrative device circumscribes the genre with a penchant for exploring vulnerable American masculinity in the context of a new post-war culture and positions the femme fatale as the missing link in attributing Strangers on a Train to the film noir cannon.

It is in regards to this element, the femme fatale, that proves to be so carefully designed as to elude the casual viewer. As indicated by Benshoff and Griffen, film noir’s femme fatales were “women who lured men into their sphere of influence and would just as easily murder a man as marry him…[the femme fatale] pursued her own desires (sexual and otherwise) instead of passively supporting the male lead” (223). Having already established two of the three criteria for situating Strangers on a Train as film noir (dark, expressionistic visual motifs and a melodramatic crime narrative centered around wounded American masculinity), I wish to argue that the character of Bruno Antony is Hitchcock’s transgressive version of a femme-fatale, a character obviously typically female, who utilizes sexuality at the expense of the male protagonist for personal gain and pleasure. x 

365filmsbyauroranocte: Shadow of a Doubt (Alfred Hitchcock,…

365filmsbyauroranocte:

Shadow of a Doubt (Alfred Hitchcock, 1943)

365filmsbyauroranocte: Shadow of a Doubt (Alfred Hitchcock,…

365filmsbyauroranocte:

Shadow of a Doubt (Alfred Hitchcock, 1943): crossfades